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Luxury Travel Blog | Travcoa

Walk Through History


A Traveler's Guide to Israel

Like pages torn from the Bible, a journey to Israel reveals the secrets of many of the world’s religions. From Nazareth to Bethlehem, the Mount of Olives to the Dome of the Rock, this tiny corner of the earth holds a staggering collection of holy sites and is the cradle of many faiths. Your pilgrimage unfolds with these must-see highlights for all who travel to this holy land.

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Topics: Israel

Is The Dead Sea Really Dead?


Traveling to Israel's Salty Sea

At nearly 1,400 feet below sea level, the Dead Sea is the lowest point on the planet. In addition, the water which evaporates from this lake in Israel is greater than the water which flows into it, creating the world’s highest concentration of salt. In fact, it’s the salinity of the water that gives the lake its name, the Dead Sea.

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Topics: Israel

Four Cultures: One City


Traveling to Jerusalem's Old City

The crossroads of history converge in the Old City of Jerusalem. Just 220 acres, this postage-stamp sized plot of land is the cradle of ancient history, age-old feuds and the intersection of three major world religions. Inside the 11 gates of the walled city are four distinct quarters where the cultures who call this place home have made their tenuous residences. 

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Topics: Israel

5 Things to See in Jerusalem


Where the Divine Meets the Earth

Heaven and Earth are said to meet at Jerusalem’s sacred mounts, but it seems the cobbled streets of this ancient city lean more toward the earthly than the divine. As the world’s most contentious piece of real estate, the city has seen it share of war, hostility and violence. Ever since King David ousted the Jebusites 3,000 years ago, everyone, it seems, has laid claim to this piece of land--from the Babylonians to the Romans, the Crusaders to the Muslims. So just what is all the fuss about? What is so special about Jerusalem?

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Topics: Israel

Festival of Lights


The Traditions of Hanukkah

The eight-day celebration of Hanukkah remembers the rededication of the Second Temple of Jerusalem during the second century B.C.

Under Syrian oppression, Jews had been banned from practicing their religion and ordered to worship Greek gods. Then, in 168 B.C., Greco-Syrian King Antiochus IV marched his soldiers into Jerusalem, massacring thousands of Jews and desecrating the temple by erecting a statue of Zeus and sacrificing pigs on the altar of the house of worship. Led by the Jewish priest Mattathias and his sons in 167 B.C., a rebellion broke out against the captors, and eventually the Syrians were driven from the city.

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Topics: Israel